#infosec #Syspeace for intrusion prevention for #windowsserver instead of specific applications or services such as #FileZilla FTP Server or #WordPress

Syspeace - intrusion prevention for Windows servers
Syspeace website

Syspeace for intrusion prevention for the entire server instead of specific applications or services such as FileZilla Server

If you’re managing a server and host various applications and services all of them are reachable for your users and and customers but most likely, and quite often, they’re also reachable for others to try to log in.

To be costeffective, you could be using using a Terminal Server (or Remote desktop Server) and you’ve also got for instance a FileZilla FTP Server to ease file transfers (or the Microsoft IIS FTP server, my hunch is that these two are the most common ones if you’re running a Windows Server environment) and there’s a web interface for the remote applications and so on . There might also be other services on the same server/servers.

Built in intrusion prevention in applications or Windows Server

Some software actually have brute force prevention built into them, such as the FileZilla FTP Server (although, keep in mind that is it not enabled by default) and there could be other software installed that have intrusion prevention built into them. Not within Windows Server though and there are quite a few articles on this blog explaining how it works such as this one about securing your Exchange OWA

An atacker will first portscan your server, search for open ports and try to figure out what services and applications you’re running on them. Even if you’ve changed the default ports, quite often the application will actually reveal itself in the header what it is and what version it is.

You can for instance simply do a telnet session to the port in question and see what your applications actually reveal about themselves.
Simply start a telnet client and connect to the port you’re interested in such as port 25 for SMTP (email) or port 21 for FTP and you’d probably get at least some information on what is running on the server. To gather more detailed and complex information, you probably be using software like nmap.

After that, tbey’ll simply use automated scripts to try and login. If there is a block in some way on for instance FileZilla FTP Server they’ll simply move on to the next port/service , like the RDWeb interface for Remote Desktop and RemoteAPP services and continue the attack since they’d only been blocked on the FTP level so far (usually port 21) Here’s a >previous article describing parts of the anatomy in a hacking attack written by Juha Jurvanen.

If you’re hosting a multiple software and srevices on a server and each of them have brute force prevention builtin , they’ll only block the attack within their own part of the system.
FileZilla will block the brute force on FTP but nothing else.

Using Syspeace as your HIPS , Host intrusion Prevention System for Windows Servers

A key difference using Syspeace as a HIPS (Host Intrusion Prevention System) is that it will block the attacker entirely on all ports if they trigger any of the detectors, rendering the attacker unable to communicate at all with your server on any port (even ping), thus automatically protecting any other service you have running on it.

To illustrate this with something in the ”real” world.
If you’ve got a house with multiple doors, the attacker would first try their keycard/key in one of the doors to try to gain access into the house until an alarm is triggered and they would have to move on, but only for that specific door.
After that they’d keep using the keycard/key on the next door and so on.
With Syspeace, they’d only be able to use the keycard on the first door until the alarm is triggered and after that they would be automatically blocked from even trying to use the keycard on any of the other doors since the doors would have ”magically” disappeared for them and would be out of reach for them. It would be as if the actual building itself would have disappeared for them.

Download a fully functional, free Syspeace trial for intrusion prevention or even if you’re under attack of a brute force or dictionary attack

Have a look at the Syspeace website and try the fully functional trial for it and see how it can help you to easily and quickly brute force protect your server. We’ve had users downnloading Syspeace and implementing it in minutes during a dictionary attack to have Syspeace automatically deal with it and to block, trace and report the attack. Since the trial is fully functional and free and it only takes a few minutes to set it up, it can be an easy solution to handle an ongoing attack.

Sysoeace supports Windows Server 2003 and on (including the Windows Server Small Business versions), SQL Server, Remote Desktop, Exchange Server, Sharepoint, Exchange OWA, RDWeb , Citrix and more. Out of the box. It actually also support Windows 7 and Windows 8 but please refer to his article on when Syspeace is actually useful for you and when it’s not.

Syspeace has blocked more than 3 126 500 brute force and dictionary attackas targetaed agains Windows Servers worldwide.

The Syspeace team has also developed a FileZilla FTP Detector that is in beta and also an Microsoft IIS FTP detector.
We’ve also released a detector for selfhosted WordPress and we’ve released the Syspeace API for .PHP and .NET to enable our users to develop their own intrusion prevention for applications instead of being forced to develop protection into applications themselves from scratch.
The Syspeace API can also be used to protect spcific websites if you’re hostng multiple websites.

Annonser

Kommentera

Fyll i dina uppgifter nedan eller klicka på en ikon för att logga in:

WordPress.com Logo

Du kommenterar med ditt WordPress.com-konto. Logga ut / Ändra )

Twitter-bild

Du kommenterar med ditt Twitter-konto. Logga ut / Ändra )

Facebook-foto

Du kommenterar med ditt Facebook-konto. Logga ut / Ändra )

Google+ photo

Du kommenterar med ditt Google+-konto. Logga ut / Ändra )

Ansluter till %s